Protein trafficking and inflammation

We are discovering new genes, proteins and cellular pathways that help us understand how inflammation is turned on and off in immune cells

 

Inflammation is an important defence against infection but it can also contribute to chronic diseases, like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, and to kidney, lung, vascular and bowel diseases, and importantly, to cancer.

Immune cells, including  macrophages, release cytokines or messengers that can over-stimulate immune responses in acute infection, causing a ‘cytokine storm’ , or they can continuously active inflammation causing tissue damage in chronic disease.

Our goal is to identify molecules and pathways that can be targeted with new or existing drugs to modulate inflammation in many disease situatios

As molecular cell biologists we are interested in the cellular pathways for cytokine secretion and for pathogen recognition and surveillance that contribute to inflammation.

Macropinocytosis is a ‘drinking and eating’ pathway for many cells. It is important for the pathogen-mediated activation of macrophages and it can be upregulated in cancer to sustain the survival of cancer cells.

Dissecting differential regulators for the control of macropinocytosis is of particular prevalence in our current research.

We partner with other groups in the IMB Centre for Inflammation and Disease Research and others around the world, for multidisciplinary research.

Group leader

Prof Jenny Stow

Professor Jenny Stow

Group Leader, Protein trafficking and inflammation

Deputy Director (Research), Institute for Molecular Bioscience

  +61 7 334 62110
  j.stow@imb.uq.edu.au
  UQ Researcher Profile

Our team

  Group Leader

  Researchers

  • Mr Darren Brown

    Senior Research Assistant
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience
  • Dr Lin Luo

    Research Officer
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience

  Students

  • Dr Nicholas Condon

    Senior Microscopist
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience
  • Ms Yu Hung

    Higher degree by research (PhD) student
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience
  • Mr Samuel Tong

    Higher degree by research (PhD) student
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience

Research excellence

$1.3 billion+ commercial investment attracted to IMB research
1454 international collaborators
 
385 original publications in 2020
 
$28M in research funding last calendar year
 
20%+ of patent families at UQ are derived from IMB research
100% of donations go to the cause
 

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