Physiology of circadian rhythms

Our research addresses an issue of critical importance targeting the understanding of the consequence of circadian disruption on health and disease

 

The rotation of the Earth around its own axis creates daily changes in the environment of all leaving species.

To anticipate these changes and be more adapted to this fluctuating environment, they have all adapted an evolutionary conserved circadian clock that controls most aspects of physiology.

The exposition to conditions that disrupt this circadian clock such as shift work, disrupted light exposure or the use of screens or smartphones at night causes chronodisruption that can have a broad impact on health, including predispositions for pathologies like obesity, diabetes, cancer or neurological disorders.

Our goal is to understand and characterize the mechanisms of how chronodisruption can lead to the development of pathology.

.Lab words

Group leader

Associate Professor Frederic Gachon

Associate Professor Frederic Gachon

Group Leader, Physiology of Circadian Rhythms

  +61 7 334 62017
  f.gachon@imb.uq.edu.au
  UQ Researcher Profile

Our approach

We use human and animal studies and Omics technologies to describe the impact of environmental factors or genetic disruption of the circadian clock on normal physiology and pathology, as well as the involved molecular mechanisms.

Aims to achieve

Our research addresses an issue of critical importance targeting the understanding of the consequence of circadian disruption on health and disease. Our understanding of the causal relationship between chronodisruption and pathologies will open new possibilities to fight these diseases and prevent their development through new health policies or pharmacological treatments.

Research areas

Our research aims at characterizing how chronodisruption leads to pathologies, in particular for:
 


Ageing

  • Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease


     


Common disease

  • Liver pathologies, including Non-Alcoholic Liver Disease
  • Metabolic diseases, obesity and diabetes


Into the future

  • Children development and growth


     

Our team

Group Leader

Researchers

Research excellence

$1.3 billion+ commercial investment attracted to IMB research
1454 international collaborators
 
~385 original publications last calendar year
 
$28M in research funding last calendar year
 
20%+ of patent families at UQ are derived from IMB research
100% of donations go to the cause
 

Help us shape the future
 

 Donate        Learn with us

Stories

Pages

Connect with us

           ​