Our researchers do great science every day. Awards play an important role in publicly recognising the significant contributions our people make to our global research efforts.

2013 IMB award highlights included:

 

Professor David Craik was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, in recognition of his pioneering research into a new type of molecule that may lead to improved treatments for pain and other diseases.
Professor Glenn King received the Beckman Coulter Discovery Science Award from the Australian Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) for his leadership in the field of venoms-based drug discovery. He was also awarded the Sir Bob Robertson Award from the Australian Society for Biophysics.
Professor Alpha Yap was named the Australia and New Zealand Society for Cell and Developmental Biology 2013 President’s Medal winner in recognition of his seminal contributions to cell biology.

Professor Matt Cooper (right) won an NHMRC Achievement Award for having the top-ranked development grant out of the 102 applications nationwide in 2012. This funding will allow his laboratory to develop improved treatments for tuberculosis, including drug-resistant strains. 

Professor Rob Parton (left) won an NHMRC Achievement Award for having the equal top-ranked project grant out of nearly 3000 applications nationwide in 2012. This funding will allow his laboratory to study a cellular pathway that appears to play a crucial role in cell migration around the body, including the spread of cancer cells.

 

Dr Lachlan Coin received a $90,000 UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award to better understand the genetic architecture of autoimmune disorders so improved therapeutics can be developed.

Dr Kate Schroder received an $80,000 UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award for research to pinpoint the pathways that allow our bodies to fight infectious diseases and develop drugs to boost our natural defences.

Kate Schroder and Queensland Science Minister Ian Walker, and a separate picture of Irina Vetter with Minister Walker Dr Kate Schroder (left) and Dr Irina Vetter were named among Queensland’s best and brightest young scientists, receiving Tall Poppy awards from the Australian Institute of Policy and Science. The awards recognise their outstanding research into infection and immunity (Schroder), and chronic pain (Vetter), and their efforts to inspire young Australians about science.
Dr Ryan Taft was named in QWeekend’s Queensland’s 50 Best and Brightest 2013 list for his discovery of a new disease, HBSL.
   

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